Grading Standards

AN “A” GRADE IS GIVEN FOR WORK WHICH IS OUTSTANDING.

  • Grammar, Spelling & Punctuation – free from error.
  • Content – the subject treatment shows superior intelligence, careful workmanship, and originality; it is interesting to read, not shallow.
  • Organization – the work is organized clearly and forcefully so that the reader knows at all times the writer’s purpose and intention.
  • Paragraphs – coherent, full, and with emphasis.
  • Sentences – precise, forceful, and interesting, always contributing to the writer’s central purpose.
  • Words & Images – exact and appropriate to their context; idioms are correct.

A “B” GRADE IS GIVEN FOR WORK WHICH IS SIGNIFICANTLY ABOVE AVERAGE.

  • Grammar, Spelling & Punctuation – more or less free from error (1-2).
  • Content – shows strong expressive competence and above average ability to relate ideas intelligently; lacks some originality of thought.
  • Organization – clear, but without the full clarity and tight coherence of the “A” paper; reader understands clearly the writer’s intentions.
  • Paragraphs – unified, coherent, and fairly well developed.
  • Sentences – fluent and sufficiently varied in type and length to make for an easy, natural style.
  • Words & Images – precise and with some concern for their connotative value.

A “C” GRADE IS GIVEN FOR WORK WHICH IS GENERALLY SATISFACTORY AND ACCEPTABLE.

  • Grammar, Spelling & Punctuation – generally correct, with a few slips (3-4).
  • Content – subject treatment is acceptable, but without distinction; it reveals some thinking but nothing in particular commends it.
  • Organization – work has a relatively clear structure (the central idea is systematically developed, perhaps a bit mechanically).
  • Paragraphs – while unified and developed, the development shows little originality.
  • Sentences – correct and linked to one another, making for basic fluency; however, stylistically wooden or repetitious, and not forceful.
  • Words & Images – generally correct but without much evocative power.

A “D” GRADE IS GIVEN FOR WORK WHICH FAILS IN SOME WAY TO ACHIEVE SATISFACTORY STATUS.

  • Grammar, Spelling & Punctuation – faulty (5-6).
  • Content – subject treatment is thin; no central idea developed.
  • Organization – while the work may be divided into subtopics, the organization is not wholly clear or effective.
  • Paragraphs – present but not fully developed or coherently focused.
  • Sentences – awkward, ambiguous, or overly simple in structure.
  • Words & Images – often imprecise or inappropriate.

AN “F” GRADE IS GIVEN FOR WORK WHICH IS INADEQUATE OR UNACCEPTABLE.

  • Grammar, Spelling & Punctuation – botched (7 or more).
  • Content – treatment is highly superficial or thoughtless.
  • Organization – not divided, or illogically divided, into subtopics indicated by systematic paragraphing.
  • Paragraphs – lack unity or are almost completely undeveloped.
  • Sentences – so confused that they obscure the meaning or are constructed in a primer-like style.
  • Words & Images – too frequently inexact or inept.